Category Archives: bat survey

Bat boxes

Written by stephen gale

One of the recommendations in our planning permission was that we should make a provision for bat habitat.  A conversation in the local pub led to us acquiring a couple of bat boxes from a local RSPB group (thanks to Dave Hardwick).  The boxes are made from offcuts of softwood from a local furniture factory.

We aren’t quite sure where to locate them yet, but the most likely location is in the larger trees in the bottom field. But more of an update on this once we have done a bit of research.

These are made by a local RSPB group from offcuts of timber from a furniture factory.  We need to work out exactly where to locate them, probably in some of the larger trees on the property rather than being attached to the house or outbuildings.

These are made by a local RSPB group from offcuts of timber from a furniture factory. We need to work out exactly where to locate them, probably in some of the larger trees on the property rather than being attached to the house or outbuildings.

Planners input on the Bat Survey

Written by stephen gale

We had a bat survey completed back in August and the survey was submitted as part of the planning application.  The survey showed no evidence of bats living in the property or the outlying buildings.

Bats

The submitted bat survey has identified some limited bat activity around the site but no evidence of bats
emerging from the buildings, although these were identified as having some potential. No further information is required.
 
The following recommendations should be followed and conditioned as appropriate:
  • All roof coverings and fascias should be removed carefully by hand
  • Should any evidence of bats be found, all works should stop and advice sought from the bat surveyor or Natural England.
Given the loss of potential bat roost features as a result of the proposal, we would suggest that one bat roost feature is incorporated into the development. Preferably, this should be an integral feature (e.g. a ‘bat brick’) or if this is not possible, an external, long-lasting ‘woodcrete’ type bat box.

Guidance is given via the following link:

Bat roost features should be sited away from artificial lighting and should not be located above windows and doors.

Swallows
In the course of the bat survey, an occupied swallow nest was identified in the existing lean-to building at the north-east side of the site. Works to this section of the site (which may cause destruction of nests or, disturbance to the resident swallows) must not take place during the bird breeding season (late March to August) or until the young have fledged.

In line with the NPPF, It would be beneficial if this nest could be retained in the final scheme. If not, then if possible, a replacement swallow nesting feature should be incorporated into the scheme in line with the following guidance:
http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/s/swallow/encouraging.aspx

Swallow nests require an open access throughout the breeding season, so are best suited to outbuildings, sheds or garages.

The results of the Bat Survey are in!

Written by admin
Although we are still waiting for the written report, it would appear that we don’t have a problem with bats.  The assessors have confirmed that there are no bats living in any of the buildings and while the survey did reveal bats foraging in some of the tress.  They only recorded one bat during their time (around 3 hours) on site. 

As soon as we have the written report, I will post more information.

Bat Survey

Written by admin
Bats are a protected species in the UK.  This means that it is a criminal offence to intentionally or recklessly kill or capture, disturb a place of shelter or destroy the resting place of a bat.  A roosting site can be protected even if there are no bats present.  Furthermore, a bat survey needs to be undertaken BEFORE a planning application can be determined.

The other compounding fact here is that the survey can only be completed at suitable times of the year, normally May to September. 

In our case, we are not likely to be submitting a planning application until after September, so if it turns out that we need a bat survey then we will have to put everything on hold until the following May when the survey can be completed.  Not a great result.

Talking to the existing owners, it would appear that there are bats in the area, so we have decided to get a bat survey completed now just in case.  But it is another added expense.  Around £1,000.