New orchard

The new orchard is now completely re-planted. 14 new trees have replaced the old ones. We left one tree from the original orchard plus one new tree that we planted two years ago.

The new trees are all planted at least 5m apart providing plenty of space for them to grow as well as enabling us to be able to mow around them easily. It took a little while to work out the planting plan mainly taking into account the two existing trees!

We have planted the following:

  • Apple Ribston Pippin Whip (M25)
  • Apple Spartan Whip (M25)
  • Apple Yorkshire Aromatic Whip (M25)
  • Cherry Morello Whip (Avium F-12/1)
  • Cherry Stella Whip (Avium F-12/1)
  • Pear Conference Whip (seedling pear)
  • Pear Doyenne du Comice Whip (seedling pear)
  • Plum Victoria (Myrobalan B)
  • Apple Ashmeads Kernel Feathered (M25)
  • Apple Blenheim Orange Whip (M25)
  • Apple Newton Wonder Feathered (M25)
  • Apple Michaelmas Red Feathered (M25)
  • Damson Merryweather Whip (Myrobalan B)
  • Plum Anna Spath Whip (Myrobalan B)

These are in addition to two existing trees:

  • Quince tree planted 2 years ago
  • Plum Victoria – the only tree left from the original orchard.

All f the new new trees came from RV Roger’s nursery based in Pickering, North Yorkshire.

Stump grinder
There were 5 tree stumps left that we simply couldn’t dig out without demolishing the dry stone wall at the same time. There was no alternative, but to grind the stumps out.

New orchard – new trees!

It has been a long time coming, but we have decided it is time to plant new trees in the orchard. It is easy to forget how overgrown this was when we first moved into the property. Despite multiple attempts at pruning the existing trees, we have finally had to admit defeat! Plus the wind has taken it’s toll on the aged trees and we have probably lost 4-5 during the last couple of years.

Cutting the existing trees down seems like a big step, but they are at the end of their life and need to make way for new ones. The existing fruit trees either bore little fruit or no fruit at all.

Looking back at the orchard when we first moved in, it is a wonder that we hadn’t done this earlier! Here’s a post from 2013!

We have replaced all of the trees with heritage varieties – all of which have been grown in Yorkshire. After talking to a number of suppliers, we ordered all of our trees with RV Rogers in Pickering.

Here’s a list of what we have planted.

The intention here is that these are full height trees (rather than dwarf trees). This will enable us to mow around them with ease.

OK, I am on a break. First job – cut the trees down into logs.
Second job is to feed the left over branches into a shredder. Third job is to dig up the roots with a mini digger!
Then it is a case of tracking in the soil where the old trees had been and reseeding the grass.
Once the grass had reseeded, it was a case of marking out where the new trees are going to go
New trees planted – the first 8 are in! The tree in the foreground on the left is a Quince tree that we planted a couple of years ago.
Each tree has a hefty stake and a strim guard (the dark brown thing at the base of each tree). This protects them when using a strimmer.
Each of the trees has a pretty hefty stake in place, plus a strim guard, felt mat and a protective green basket (to protect it from chickens, dogs and deer!).

And just for the sheer hell of it, here are a couple of pictures from the orchard in 2013/2014.

This was after we had had a good tidy up. The old shed is gone and the trees have been pruned back.
The dry stone wall along the edge of the orchard has been rebuilt – if there was ever one there in the first place!
Here’s the orchard as it was when we first moved in.
The shed at the end of the orchard (this is where the gates are now).

Apple juice from the orchard

We collected about 4 large sacks of apples from the orchard a couple of weeks ago.  Rob North pressed the apples to use the juice for cider, but he dropped off a litre of apple juice yesterday afternoon.  It actually tastes remarkably alright – the apples were a little to sharp too eat, but the juice is very drinkable.

Juice from the orchard courtesy of Rob North