Tag Archives: Mimbolovesandblasting

Roof going back on

Written by stephen gale

Work started this morning on putting the roof back on the existing building.  By the end of the day all of the roofing felt and lathes will be on the building.  This is a milestone since from this point onwards the building is no longer completely open to the elements.

It will take 7-10 days to get the roof completely finished, assuming there aren’t any problems.

You can also see the two rebuilt chimneys that now match – before the chimney on the left was smaller, rendered and had no string course.  The chimneys, as the rest of the external masonry, has been sandblasted over the last weekend.

 

The two chimneys have been rebuilt and sandblasted.  So too has the rear of the property.  The felt and lathes are going on first to be followed by the stone slates.

The two chimneys have been rebuilt and sandblasted. So too has the rear of the property. The felt and lathes are going on first to be followed by the stone slates.

End of day 1 on the roof and the felt and lathes have been installed.  This means that the worst of the weather will be kept out.  There is still a chance that rain may come through some of the window openings, but fingers crossed the weather shouldn't be too bad for the next couple of weeks.

End of day 1 on the roof and the felt and lathes have been installed. This means that the worst of the weather will be kept out. There is still a chance that rain may come through some of the window openings, but fingers crossed the weather shouldn’t be too bad for the next couple of weeks.

The "felt" is actually a green coloured plastic.  It feels a little bit like a tent wit only the felt and lathes on the roof. With the green felt on the roof, there is a green tinge to the light everywhere.

The “felt” is actually a green coloured plastic. It feels a little bit like a tent wit only the felt and lathes on the roof. With the green felt on the roof, there is a green tinge to the light everywhere.

Sandblasting – Day 2

Written by stephen gale

Well, 7:30pm on Sunday evening and it is all done.  Front, back, chimneys, timbers, and 3 fireplaces.  It took around 45 bags of sand (each 25kgs) to complete the work.  That’s a lot of sand, but I will leave you to do the maths!

It now looks superb, but it isn’t something that I would want to do every weekend!

All the window reveals were cleaned of as much mastic as possible and then cleaned so that the windows can be installed.  The old windows were not set equally – some were further out than others – we will fix this issue when fitting the new ones.  This is why all the window reveals needed to be cleaned.

The newly rebuilt chimneys were also sandblasted.  Dragging all the tubes around isn’t easy work, but it only took 30-40 minutes to sandblast the chimneys.  They do look superb.

I will post pictures of sandblasted timber and fireplaces later.

Working left to right, the front of the property is sandblasted.

Working left to right, the front of the property is sandblasted.

The stone surround on the doorway to number 8 was painted. This doesn't last long when sandblasted.

The stone surround on the doorway to number 8 was painted. This doesn’t last long when sandblasted.

Sandblasting the window reveals

Sandblasting the second chimney was a little easier as the scaffolding was still in place around it.

Sandblasting the second chimney was a little easier as the scaffolding was still in place around it.

Two sidese of the new chimeny have been sandblasted.  The stone was salvaged from the old porch.

Two sides of the new chimney have been sandblasted. The stone was salvaged from the old porch.

Sandblasting – Day 1

Written by stephen gale

It is going to take a couple of days to sandblast the outside of the property, the fireplaces (x3) and the oak trusses and purlins in the roof.  This work is being done at the weekend, so that it doesn’t interrupt any of the building work – no one can really work on site while the sandblasting is going on due to the noise and dust.

Proceedings didn’t start until just after lunch, but by 4:30pm the rear and one side of the property had been cleaned including one of the fireplaces.  The idea is to gently lighten the stone and remove some of the black grime and soot that has built up over the last couple of hundred years.  This dark outer layer keeps moisture out, so once the stone has been cleaned, it will need to be treated with a sealant.

The stonework to the right has been lightly sandblasted to take some of the black soot and grime off the old stonework.  Ironically, it is the grime that makes the stone waterproof, so once it has been sandblasted the stone will be treated with a sealant.

The stonework to the right has been lightly sandblasted to take some of the black soot and grime off the old stonework. Ironically, it is the grime that makes the stone waterproof, so once it has been sandblasted the stone will be treated with a sealant.

This is not a job for the faint hearted

This is not a job for the faint hearted

Yup, he is still there under that plume of sand.  It took about 30 - 40 minutes to sandblast the rear of the property once all of the kit was set up.

Yup, he is still there under that plume of sand. It took about 30 – 40 minutes to sandblast the rear of the property once all of the kit was set up.

The rear of the property has been completely sandblasted.  Tomorrow, it will be the chimneys, the front, the fireplaces and the oak roof trusses.

The rear of the property has been completely sandblasted. Tomorrow, it will be the chimneys, the front, the fireplaces and the oak roof trusses.

Getting ready for the sand blasters

Written by stephen gale

The outside of the house, the oak roof trusses and the fireplaces are due to be sandblasted this weekend.  This also includes the new rebuilt chimneys.  There is a lot to get read in the next four days:

  • All the oak trusses and purlins need to be re-installed.  To be able to do this, the internal wall that holds up the purlins needs to be rebuilt;
  • All the windows (upstairs and downstairs) need to be removed as the stone reveals need to be sandblasted before the new windows can be installed;
  • The new ashlar stone surrounds for the windows and doors need to be installed.  Some of the existing stone surrounds are modern concrete (called “ArtStone”) replacements.  These are being removed and replaced with the real thing;
  • Two new chimneys need to be rebuilt.  One will be using the existing stone, the other will use the stone from the old porch.
The stone for the chimenys is stacked on pallets ready to be rebuilt.  Zep is in the background looking for any leftover coleslaw!  Blame the builders!

The stone for the chimenys is stacked on pallets ready to be rebuilt. Zep is in the background looking for any leftover coleslaw! Blame the builders!

Sandblasting

Written by stephen gale

The outside of the property is going to be sandblasted.  The old gritstone has gone very black over the years.  We don’t want to make it look new, but we do want to lighten up the colour.

So today we had a go at sandblasting some test panels – two on the back and one on the front (actually, the front of the barn).

We are going to go with a fairly light sandblasting rather than taking the stone right back.  The grime that has built up on the masonry over the years actually makes the stone waterproof.  The sandblasting removes this waterproof layer, so after the stone has been sandblasted, it will be treated with a waterproof sealant.

The panel underneath the window has been sand-blasted to an almost new finish.  The panel to camera-right of the window has been lightly sanded.  This is the finish that we have chosen.

The panel underneath the window has been sand-blasted to an almost new finish. The panel to camera-right of the window has been lightly sanded. This is the finish that we have chosen.

The barn will be re-built as part of the phase 2 work, but while we were sand-blasting some test panels, we thought it was worth trying on the stone on the barn.  This is lightly sanded and it makes a huge difference.

The barn will be re-built as part of the phase 2 work, but while we were sand-blasting some test panels, we thought it was worth trying on the stone on the barn. This is lightly sanded and it makes a huge difference.

The two timbers on the left have been bought from a reclamation yard and will be used to replace some of the purlins in the roof.

The two timbers on the left have been bought from a reclamation yard and will be used to replace some of the purlins in the roof.

While we were sandblasting some test panels on the house, we thought we should sandblast some of the timbers.  The top timber (the one with the blue writing) has not be sandblasted, the bottom two have.  The top two timbers have been bought from a reclamation yard and will be used to replace some of the broken purlins in the roof.

While we were sandblasting some test panels on the house, we thought we should sandblast some of the timbers. The top timber (the one with the blue writing) has not be sandblasted, the bottom two have. The top two timbers have been bought from a reclamation yard and will be used to replace some of the broken purlins in the roof.