The porch

Ever since we have owned the property, we have wanted to get rid of the porch.  It is a later (much later) addition and has never really fitted in with the rest of the property – white uPVC windows and Welsh slate on the roof doesn’t really help.  We have resisted demolishing it until now as it will make the site look like a building site, but with the builders due to start next week, it is time for it to go!

The first job is to remove the gutters and the rainwater pipes to allow access to the roof.  Then it is time for the plaster board inside the porch to be removed together with the polystyrene slabs of insulation inside the roof space.

The most difficult job is to remove the slates off the roof.  The slates are pretty green and slippery, so climbing on the roof isn’t a great idea.  So we removed the slates from the edge of the roof while standing on a set of ladders, then it was a case of climbing on the roof and working from right to left removing the slates as we go while standing on the battens.  The slates were pretty damaged and with a small roof like this, there is little point in trying to save them – you might end up with a dozen or so good slates.

With the slates removed, the battens and the felt come off next.  Then the underlying timbers are removed.

The double glazed units were a little more of a challenge since they were screwed together before the glass was put in.  This means to take it apart requires removing the glass units first.  Alternatively, you can prize the units apart and use an angle grinder to cut through the retaining screws.

 

Here's the porch before being removed.  The dates that we found on the double glazed units when demolitioning it stated that they were manufactured in 1999.  I suspect that these were a later addition so this porch has been here for a while.  I don't really understand the two bricks at the base of the retaining wall (next to the steps).

Here’s the porch before being removed. The dates that we found on the double glazed units when demolitioning it stated that they were manufactured in 1999. I suspect that these were a later addition so this porch has been here for a while. I don’t really understand the two bricks at the base of the retaining wall (next to the steps).

The inside of the porch with the plasterboard ceiling removed.  Various bits of polystrene had been put into the roof space to insulate it (in a bit of a half hearted sort of way).

The inside of the porch with the plasterboard ceiling removed. Various bits of polystrene had been put into the roof space to insulate it (in a bit of a half hearted sort of way).

Apparently, it isn't fair to let an 80 year old climb on the roof.  Oh well, I guess, I'll have to do it.  Jo's dad looks on.

Apparently, it isn’t fair to let an 80 year old climb on the roof. Oh well, I guess, I’ll have to do it. Jo’s dad looks on.

Slates and felt removed from the porch

The slates, felt and timber removed.  The lead flashing is still attached to the main wall.  This will be removed to go to the scrapyard next week.

The slates, felt and timber removed. The lead flashing is still attached to the main wall. This will be removed to go to the scrapyard next week.

Slates, felt and timbers have now been removed from the roof of the porch leaving just the double glazed units.

Slates, felt and timbers have now been removed from the roof of the porch leaving just the double glazed units.

Just the small retaining wall left with the rendering on the inside of the porch.  This will get removed before the property is sand blasted.

Just the small retaining wall left with the rendering on the inside of the porch. This will get removed before the property is sand blasted.

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